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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone, happy to join this group.

In the market for a 4xe. Obviously right not is a difficult time to find the exact one we want, but trying to convince myself if the 4xe is really worth it over the 2.0 I4 gasoline only model. My thoughts are this.... and please confirm or modify my impressions, now that I've test drove one.

1. 49MPG vs 21MPG yes, but is that actually true? I test drove one the other day said average mpg 17.0mpg, obviously its a new car off the lot without much history to "average" but still. Also the 49MPG I believe means when the electric part is fully charged, which only has a range of 22miles on the battery... which leads to my next and most important question...
2. TRUE savings? Being as every night I have to plug this in to keep the battery charged, has anyone done the math to see approximately how much this has risen the cost of their home electric bill? <---
3. MSRP to MSRP the 4xe is about $5,000 more than the comparable 2.0 I4 gasoline, but how much is the real cost/margin?
4. If we are looking to sell the car in 3-5 years, which will be worth more? On one hand, the gasoline engine will never be a bad sell, and who knows maybe people don't like to purchase 3-5yr old hybrids because of the uncertain life expectancy of the battery? But on another hand.. with this transition to more "green" options, in 3-5 years will the hybrid be more sought out?

Thanks in advance for answering these questions!
 

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1. MPGE is an efficiency rating created by the EPA to rate electrified vehicles. It has been widely miscommunicated that it is some sort of hybrid gas milage. It's not. It's a formulaic efficiency rating that the EPA came up with the compare EVs to gas vehicles: Miles per gallon gasoline equivalent - Wikipedia. I'm seeing about 24MPG after battery depletion when running in straight hybrid mode. However, I haven't done any really long tests to confirm that recently. I did those early on and from what I understand, these engines get better over the first few thousand miles.

2. I drove an EV for 4.5 years before buying this so any increase isn't terribly noticeable. It's about $1.94 to charge it from zero where I live and I pay around 12 cents per kWh. So that price tag will vary depending on what you pay for power. I estimate that it's about $50 a month for charging but that's a pretty wild estimation.

3. If you similarly equip a gas model to a 4XE, it's somewhere in the $3800 dollar difference. There are some standard features on the 4XE that are options on the gas models. Keep in mind, it qualifies for up to $7500 credit when you file your federal taxes. That's based on your total obligation so $7500 isn't guaranteed.

4. That's a great question. I really wonder that myself. Batteries should be good for 12-15 years based on more recent studies but that's a bit of an unknown on resale. I plan on driving mine for many years so that's not something I've researched much. I don't buy vehicles with resale in mind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks so much man for answering those questions.

Also when I read the 375hp and 470lb torque in the 4xe vs 275hp and 290lb torque in the 2.0 gasoline model is that only when the battery is charged? So is the battery contributing to that performance like if not charged does it drop to the same horsepower and torque? I'm thinking so, sorry about the newb question.
 

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Yeah, that confusion is common - the Jeep keeps the battery full enough that you always have all 470 ft-lbs available. "dead", when it shows "<1%" on the screen, means there is a reserve left for both full power accelerations and running in hybrid mode.
 

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As far as the battery is concerned, we have a 2010 Prius with close to 200,000 miles. the capacity of the battery is somewhat reduced but is still fully functional and the the car still gets excellent gas milage. Battery chemistry has improved greatly in the last 11 years and current batteries remain at 80% capacity at over 3000 charge cycles. I fully expect our jeep battery to be at 80% capacity in 10 years.
 

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Thanks so much man for answering those questions.

Also when I read the 375hp and 470lb torque in the 4xe vs 275hp and 290lb torque in the 2.0 gasoline model is that only when the battery is charged? So is the battery contributing to that performance like if not charged does it drop to the same horsepower and torque? I'm thinking so, sorry about the newb question.
We’re all newbs and we’re all learning.
 

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I look at the overnight charge as the ride in to work. I can usually make it to my first appt. on what's left. About 21-25 miles. Its like a near free gallon of gas as there is some cost to charge at home. Then I am on hybrid for the rest of the day. If I head over to Whole Foods, I can get a 50% charge in an hour and a half.

I can make 500+ miles per tank of gas. I average somewhere around 29 MPGe. I never forget the extra power over the gas only. So far so good. I am really enjoying the Rubi.
 

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I’ve been getting about 30 miles electric, that’s stop and go, and below 55mph. I think it’s 100% worth it if your normal daily commute is around 25 miles round trip. It’s 2021 and it’s the right thing to do.
I will say that going long distance highway speed the mpg is not great, but that’s expected with a brick shaped car and little opportunity for regen. It’s all about what your normal daily commute is IMO.
 

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Something else overlooked is the electric driving feel. I'm finding it an absolute joy to drive around, top open, in such peacefulness. Even if you do a hard pull with the engine on it accelerates so smoothly with what feels like no effort. All that considered, it takes away looking at this as purely a purely numbers game.

If the electricity cost more than the gas the electricity would be the premium grade fuel!

People spend $10-$25K more on upgraded ICE engines, knowing they are going to burn even more gas.
 

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Something else overlooked is the electric driving feel. I'm finding it an absolute joy to drive around, top open, in such peacefulness. Even if you do a hard pull with the engine on it accelerates so smoothly with what feels like no effort. All that considered, it takes away looking at this as purely a purely numbers game.

If the electricity cost more than the gas the electricity would be the premium grade fuel!

People spend $10-$25K more on upgraded ICE engines, knowing they are going to burn even more gas.
This is a good point
 

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Gas engines burn more gas as speed increases. The battery charge is the same. The faster you go the more battery you burn.

I often start with 28 miles at 100%. I usually get 21-23 miles depending on my route and speed.
 

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If you are looking for the ultimate electric hybrid vehicle for mileage and savings - this is not it. There are better choices.

If you want the most badass off road vehicle made, and get 20 miles of electric range/30 MPG of hybrid range, then the 4XE is it!!
 

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Hello everyone, happy to join this group.

In the market for a 4xe. Obviously right not is a difficult time to find the exact one we want, but trying to convince myself if the 4xe is really worth it over the 2.0 I4 gasoline only model. My thoughts are this.... and please confirm or modify my impressions, now that I've test drove one.

1. 49MPG vs 21MPG yes, but is that actually true? I test drove one the other day said average mpg 17.0mpg, obviously its a new car off the lot without much history to "average" but still. Also the 49MPG I believe means when the electric part is fully charged, which only has a range of 22miles on the battery... which leads to my next and most important question...
2. TRUE savings? Being as every night I have to plug this in to keep the battery charged, has anyone done the math to see approximately how much this has risen the cost of their home electric bill? <---
3. MSRP to MSRP the 4xe is about $5,000 more than the comparable 2.0 I4 gasoline, but how much is the real cost/margin?
4. If we are looking to sell the car in 3-5 years, which will be worth more? On one hand, the gasoline engine will never be a bad sell, and who knows maybe people don't like to purchase 3-5yr old hybrids because of the uncertain life expectancy of the battery? But on another hand.. with this transition to more "green" options, in 3-5 years will the hybrid be more sought out?

Thanks in advance for answering these questions!
I regards to resale I don’t think anyone can predict anymore. I just sold my 2012 Unlimited Sport for 21778 - and I only paid just over 28k for it in October 2011. It had 75000 miles too. I never would have imagined getting that much. Unfortunately I’m Jeep-less right now while waiting for my 4xe to be shipped.
 

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I regards to resale I don’t think anyone can predict anymore. I just sold my 2012 Unlimited Sport for 21778 - and I only paid just over 28k for it in October 2011. It had 75000 miles too. I never would have imagined getting that much. Unfortunately I’m Jeep-less right now while waiting for my 4xe to be shipped.
I've seen so many people sell for a profit too, it's crazy. But having looked at used wranglers in the past it makes sense.

My concern is that the current Uconnect system is outdated it will take big hit when the newer android based Uconnect systems are out.
 

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May of the auto manufacturers are switching to android OS for their next generation infotainment systems. This is over the proprietary embedded systems they have been using.

They will still run CarPlay through them.
 

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2. TRUE savings? Being as every night I have to plug this in to keep the battery charged, has anyone done the math to see approximately how much this has risen the cost of their home electric bill?

Keep in mind, in most modes, driving pretty "regular", you're mostly/only using battery up front - especially around town - in those cases, you're more or less +substituting+ the cost of gas for the cost of electricity.

In our case, sure there's some additional electrical cost of ~$1.73 per 30 miles, but that's 30 miles of gas we aren't buying, at $2.80/g for 87 (and more like ~23-24MPG so that same 30 miles would cost double).
 

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With a level 1 charger it would be tough to hit $3 in one day.

I managed 40 miles on all electric in one day when I had early and late trips.
 

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With a level 1 charger it would be tough to hit $3 in one day.

I managed 40 miles on all electric in one day when I had early and late trips.
Wow, nice!

We've definitely been hitting 30-32 no problem (and that's not running it out, just projecting based on use down to ~15%), for around town use, in the 35-45MPH range.
 
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