Jeep Wrangler 4xe Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Jeep revealed the fully electric Wrangler "Magneto" concept, along with 3 other Jeep concepts at the Easter Jeep Safari in Moab.
  • Axial flux electric motor (6,000 rpm)
  • 6 speed manual transmission
  • 273 lb.-ft. torque
  • 285 horsepower
  • Power meant to simulate V6 driving experience
  • 0-60 mph in 6.8 seconds
  • Four battery packs with a combined power of 70 kW/h
  • 800-volt system
  • JPP 2-inch lift kit
  • 17-inch Lights
  • Out black metallic wheels with 35-inch mud-terrain tires
  • Custom roll cage
  • Mopar Rock Rails
  • Steel bumpers with a Warn winch
  • Steel belly pan

The Jeep Wrangler Magneto concept is a fully capable BEV that is stealthy, quiet, quick and an unmistakable rock-climbing force. Jeep brand engineers and designers have created a zero-emission vehicle with Jeep 4x4 capability that provides new levels of efficiency, environmental responsibility, and performance on- and off-road.

Based on a two-door 2020 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon, the Jeep Magneto uses a custom-built axial flux electric motor that operates up to 6,000 rpm. The e-motor is connected to a six-speed manual transmission, creating a unique manual-electric powertrain with a clutch that operates as it would with an internal combustion engine. In quick-shift scenarios, the e-motor engages regen upon clutch engagement to prevent rev-hang.

Comparable to the 3.6-liter Pentastar V-6, the compact e-motor is tuned to deliver up to 273 lb.-ft. of torque and 285 horsepower. Intentional calibrations developed during testing help the Magneto’s powertrain emulate the driving experience of the V-6, matching not only torque but also horsepower. During moderate driving, the performance difference between the V-6 and the Magneto’s unique manual-electric powertrain is negligible except for near-silent operation.

When greater acceleration is needed, the e-motor delivers all 273 lb.-ft. of torque without the need to build up revolutions per minute. The Magneto concept runs 0-60 mph in 6.8 seconds.

Powering the Jeep Magneto’s e-motor are four battery packs with a combined power of 70 kW/h, running an 800-volt system. The lithium-ion batteries are distributed around the Wrangler to balance weight on the four wheels. One pack replaces the Wrangler’s mid-ship fuel tank, another is mounted opposite the fuel tank location, the third pack sits atop the e-motor under the hood and the fourth pack mounts in the space normally used for a rear storage compartment, also using space typically occupied by the exhaust muffler.

An inverter derived from race cars converts DC power to AC for the high-tech motor. The batteries, a vehicle interface box and the battery control module all reside in waterproof enclosures to maintain the Wrangler’s 30-inch water-traversing capability. A 12-volt battery powers existing systems, such as the radio and lighting. A second 12-volt battery serves as an auxiliary power unit (APU) for accessories, such as the winch. A DC-to-DC converter charges both 12-volt batteries, allowing long-term operation of accessories to power a campsite or an unexpectedly long winch operation. Unique mounts secure the battery packs for harsh driving and custom skid plates protect the packs from potential strikes to the undercarriage while traversing harsh terrain.

A 10-kw high-voltage heater keeps the fully open-air passenger compartment comfortable.

The exterior of the Magneto features a Bright White color with Surf Blue accents, along with a heavy-duty performance hood with center scoop and custom decal, redesigned rear gate and dramatic full-width forward lighting. Custom Royal Blue and Black leather seats with Sapphire-colored inserts and straps, Surf Blue truck bed liner and Mopar slush mats give the Magneto’s interior design an electrified appearance.

The Jeep Magneto comes equipped with a JPP 2-inch lift kit, 17-inch Lights Out black metallic wheels with 35-inch mud-terrain tires, custom roll cage, Mopar Rock Rails, steel bumpers with a Warn winch and a steel belly pan for added off-road capability.

155
156
157
158
159
160
161
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
The Magneto has air cooled batteries and no DC Fast Charging. Those are two elements that have to change for mass marketing an all electric Wrangler. That charge port location on the cowl may prove to be a difficult place for a CCS port since they are so much taller than a standard J-1772. DCFC is pretty much impossible without active thermal battery management.

All that being said, I can’t wait to see what Jeep does down the road. Should be cool to watch happen. This is a great starting point for full electrification.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The Magneto has air cooled batteries and no DC Fast Charging. Those are two elements that have to change for mass marketing an all electric Wrangler. That charge port location on the cowl may prove to be a difficult place for a CCS port since they are so much taller than a standard J-1772. DCFC is pretty much impossible without active thermal battery management.

All that being said, I can’t wait to see what Jeep does down the road. Should be cool to watch happen. This is a great starting point for full electrification.
Very good points, DC fast charging is an absolute must. One I want them to change for a production model is the power numbers. Matching the power numbers to the V6 Wrangler doesn't make sense to me at all when EVs have so much performance potential to offer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
The Magneto has air cooled batteries and no DC Fast Charging. Those are two elements that have to change for mass marketing an all electric Wrangler. That charge port location on the cowl may prove to be a difficult place for a CCS port since they are so much taller than a standard J-1772. DCFC is pretty much impossible without active thermal battery management.

All that being said, I can’t wait to see what Jeep does down the road. Should be cool to watch happen. This is a great starting point for full electrification.
Would you say the lack of DC fast charging is a deal breaker? Or could Level 2 be sufficient to start?

I noticed quite a few of EV owners get by just fine with overnight charging at home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Would you say the lack of DC fast charging is a deal breaker? Or could Level 2 be sufficient to start?

I noticed quite a few of EV owners get by just fine with overnight charging at home.
I think it would be for me. It needs to be an available option for longer trips or If I forget to plug it in at home. It really limits what an EV can be used for.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top