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Newbie here. We got a new house and this is in the outside. Would this work for a phase 2 charger adapter? Thank you in advance.
Yes, That’s a NEMA 14-50 plug, so the outlet is rated for up to 50 Amps. You should look at the electrical panel it’s attached to to double check what AMP breaker the outlet is connected to so you’ll know the appropriate amperage EVSE charger to use.
 

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Newbie here. We got a new house and this is in the outside. Would this work for a phase 2 charger adapter? Thank you in advance.
You lucky person you... Yeah, up to 40A Level 2 Charger - but you probably don't need anything higher then a 32A one for the 4XE. No one has been able to tell me the max KW or Amperage at 240V the 4XE can take... My Tesla can handle up to 48A, but the mobile charger will only put out 32A and even without a gas engine it's been more then enough.
 

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You lucky person you... Yeah, up to 40A Level 2 Charger - but you probably don't need anything higher then a 32A one for the 4XE. No one has been able to tell me the max KW or Amperage at 240V the 4XE can take... My Tesla can handle up to 48A, but the mobile charger will only put out 32A and even without a gas engine it's been more then enough.
You can search for 4xe specifications and there is a complete set of data for all systems.
‘Here is the high voltage battery. Your number is 7.2 kW maximum charge rate.
BTW, by code, a 50amp NEMA 14-50 plug as shown in the picture, will handle a maximum of 40 amps.
‘The 4xe will use a maximum of 30 amps during the charge cycle. 7200kW/240volts = 30amps.
‘No point in buying a Level 2 charges over 32 amps, since the Jeep can’t use it, unless you have another car that can charge at 40 amps.
‘Hope this helps.
407
 

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Newbie here. We got a new house and this is in the outside. Would this work for a phase 2 charger adapter? Thank you in advance.
Make sure you get a waterproof unit, if you are going to have to mount the charger outside. Plus, becuse it will be an expensive piece of equipment and sometimes they develop legs and walk away, make sure it has a secure way of mounting, so only you can remove it. Check out the JuiceBox. It is waterproof, has variable charge rates, a solid mounting bracket you can securely screw it to a stud, and key security to keep anyone from easily stealing it. Most plug in chargers only come with a 2’ to 3’ pigtail cord to plug from the charger to the 14-50 outlet.
The JuiceBox comes in several charger ratings, I bought the 40amp (Max you will get out of a 50amp circuit, for safety reasons) it charges my 4xe from <1% to full in 2hrs 15min.
 

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You can search for 4xe specifications and there is a complete set of data for all systems.
‘Here is the high voltage battery. Your number is 7.2 kW maximum charge rate.
BTW, by code, a 50amp NEMA 14-50 plug as shown in the picture, will handle a maximum of 40 amps.
‘The 4xe will use a maximum of 30 amps during the charge cycle. 7200kW/240volts = 30amps.
‘No point in buying a Level 2 charges over 32 amps, since the Jeep can’t use it, unless you have another car that can charge at 40 amps.
‘Hope this helps.
View attachment 407
That helps. I kept trying to Google that info with poor results.. I have a Tesla that'll take up to 48A for level 2 charging. 250KW for level 3. 40 is max only for continous loads on a 50A which is defined by more then 3 hours. Even though I follow that for EV charging regardless. For me it makes sense to ger a plug in 40A so when I roadtrip in my Tesla I can charge faster at rv parks.
 

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That helps. I kept trying to Google that info with poor results.. I have a Tesla that'll take up to 48A for level 2 charging. 250KW for level 3. 40 is max only for continous loads on a 50A which is defined by more then 3 hours. Even though I follow that for EV charging regardless. For me it makes sense to ger a plug in 40A so when I roadtrip in my Tesla I can charge faster at rv parks.
You may be confusing the National Electric Code NEC, and the Underwriter Laboratories UL.
‘The NEC is what all electricians and manufacturers go by.
UL does not rate or rule on loading, they rate an appliance as meeting their standards.
From the NEC code,
If you have a branch circuit supplying nothing but continuous loads, (not motors), then the minimum conductor size must have an ampacity of 125% of the load by 210.19(A)(1) and the overcurrent protection must be 125% of the load by 210.20(A). Therefore, the breaker must be loaded to no more than 80% of its rating. These were not changed in the 2002 code.

The UL code agrees with the NEC,
From the 2003 UL white book
CIRCUIT BREAKERS, MOLDED-CASE AND CIRCUIT BREAKER ENCLOSURES (DIVQ)
MAXIMUM LOAD
Unless otherwise marked, circuit breakers should not be loaded to exceed 80 percent of their current rating, where in normal operation the load will continue for 3 hours or more.
in practical terms, of real world experience, If you load ONE leg of a 50 amp breaker with 45 amps for 30 to 60 minutes you will trip the breaker. If you load both legs with 45 amps, it will trip the breaker in 30 minutes or less. And if, as you say, you load it with 48 amps on both legs, you will be going out to the breaker box every five minutes and after the second or third time, you will be buying a new breaker. I only say this as a retired Registered Electrical Engineer with 42 years of experience.

The major problem you risk by exceeding 80% of the rated capacity of a circuit is a fire.
 

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Not confusing anything. I go by the 80% rule that's in the NEC. Now my electric company doesn't. They run 1/0 cable for 200amp service as an example. And I have mistakenly pulled 32A from a 30A breaker for 2 hours. However it was sub zero out (outside outlet). Power company says its Alaska we don't see high temps. We will replace it if it blows. They undersize everything up here which drives me nuts.

The rule I was quoting that I happen to not agree with was the 3hours straight at max 80%. I won't run more then 40A on that circuit. At my house I use a 32A Tesla UMC, the run is 6/3 wire with a 50A breaker 10 foot run. 14-50 outlet. The tesla unit will derate if it gets hot. Even at the plug end on the wall. It hasn't yet. But of course I'm way under 80%. I do charge for 6 or more hours straight.

I trust you more then me because I'm not a licensed electrician. I have worked with ones with your level of experience though and even verified things with them. Internet sucks because its hard to explain it all out at least for me.
 

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You may be confusing the National Electric Code NEC, and the Underwriter Laboratories UL.
‘The NEC is what all electricians and manufacturers go by.
UL does not rate or rule on loading, they rate an appliance as meeting their standards.
From the NEC code,
If you have a branch circuit supplying nothing but continuous loads, (not motors), then the minimum conductor size must have an ampacity of 125% of the load by 210.19(A)(1) and the overcurrent protection must be 125% of the load by 210.20(A). Therefore, the breaker must be loaded to no more than 80% of its rating. These were not changed in the 2002 code.

The UL code agrees with the NEC,
From the 2003 UL white book

in practical terms, of real world experience, If you load ONE leg of a 50 amp breaker with 45 amps for 30 to 60 minutes you will trip the breaker. If you load both legs with 45 amps, it will trip the breaker in 30 minutes or less. And if, as you say, you load it with 48 amps on both legs, you will be going out to the breaker box every five minutes and after the second or third time, you will be buying a new breaker. I only say this as a retired Registered Electrical Engineer with 42 years of experience.

The major problem you risk by exceeding 80% of the rated capacity of a circuit is a fire.
Now that I've been able to read this - the key wording is continuous and that's were I get pushback from electricians when I say 80% of rated load. The Jeep charges in 2 hours and change at 32A - Continuous is defined as 3 or more hours by the code you quoted. Therefore, a 32A breaker (if they made one) would technically NOT be overloading it per code. I go by the 80% rule - 40A max on a 50A, even though right now I'm even better at 32A. That's the charging the Jeep qualifier. But since you don't know if a different vehicle will be plugging in and drawing more then 80% for more then 3 hours - 80% rule is the best. It's why my 125A electric service has a 100A breaker supplying my main box on it.

So, since I never know what electrician is going to try and put their spin on things - I'm staying out of it. I've had heated discussions with power company workers and a few electrical companies up here with their tiny wires supplying power that'd make any other electrician cringe.
 
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