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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My SR 4xe hit the dealer lot earlier this week, it's scheduled to undergo configuration tomorrow, and the earliest I am free to pick it up is Sunday. As such, I've been getting some random shower thoughts about driving it. Most I could answer by looking things up, but here's one where after doing a bunch of reading, I am actually MORE confused than before! (To be fair, most of my reading was done on the Wranger forums since there is not a lot about this topic for GC's just yet).

The way I understand it (please correct me if I am wrong) is:
1. Hybrid mode - this is where you want to leave it most of the time for longer trips, all other things being equal (see below). It runs both the gas and electric engine and maximizes efficiency of both.
2. Electric - runs electric only. This is where you want to leave it for shorter trips (going to the grocery store etc) under the 26 mile mark.
3. e-save - runs gas only. Only to be used in special situations where you want/need to run gas only. For example, you want to run electric only when you get to your destination for some reason.

I have fairly long commutes to the different sites I work at most days, and here's where the shower thoughts kicked in this morning. Obviously, when I'm just going to and from a local site, I'm going to keep it in electric mode, but it's the longer commutes that I haven't fully reasoned out yet. Maybe I won't be able to and I'll just have to do trial and error. The 4 main "out of county" places I work all require a 5 minute drive in suburban traffic before the following:

Site 1 (33 miles total): 15 miles suburban/semi rural driving followed by 16 miles rural driving and about 2 miles of city driving.
Site 2 (64 miles total): 3 miles suburban driving, 56 miles interstate, 5 miles city driving
Site 3 (86 miles total): 3 miles suburban driving, 74 miles interstate, 9 miles city driving
Site 4 (69 miles total): 3 miles suburban driving, 64 miles interstate, 2 miles city driving

None of these sites will I make it on electric alone, but I theorize that the most cost efficient way of doing things is to use electric when gas is least efficient (city driving). So, I'm guessing that to use the least amount of gas (and therefore save as much money as possible at the pump) I should be using electric only at the beginning and end of my drive. Once I get up to speed with cruse control on, switch it to hybrid (or esave?) and then when I get close to my exit, switch it back into electric only. But how do I maximize the amount of battery I am using so that I run out of battery just as I get to work (where I can charge my car)? And would interstate driving be better in hybrid, esave, or does it not matter?

Author's note: Yes, I understand that the easiest would be just to run out the electric on the first portion of my drive and throw it into hybrid after and not worry about it, and that this is likely going to change my cost of my drive by less than $1 at most. Hence why it is a shower thought and not me truly worrying about the answer to the question. And if I weren't sitting here waiting for a meeting to start, none of you guys would even know what I was thinking about for 10 minutes this morning! But alas, I am still here waiting for this meeting to start so now all of your are tortured with thinking about it as well!
 

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My SR 4xe hit the dealer lot earlier this week, it's scheduled to undergo configuration tomorrow, and the earliest I am free to pick it up is Sunday. As such, I've been getting some random shower thoughts about driving it. Most I could answer by looking things up, but here's one where after doing a bunch of reading, I am actually MORE confused than before! (To be fair, most of my reading was done on the Wranger forums since there is not a lot about this topic for GC's just yet).

The way I understand it (please correct me if I am wrong) is:
1. Hybrid mode - this is where you want to leave it most of the time for longer trips, all other things being equal (see below). It runs both the gas and electric engine and maximizes efficiency of both.
2. Electric - runs electric only. This is where you want to leave it for shorter trips (going to the grocery store etc) under the 26 mile mark.
3. e-save - runs gas only. Only to be used in special situations where you want/need to run gas only. For example, you want to run electric only when you get to your destination for some reason.

I have fairly long commutes to the different sites I work at most days, and here's where the shower thoughts kicked in this morning. Obviously, when I'm just going to and from a local site, I'm going to keep it in electric mode, but it's the longer commutes that I haven't fully reasoned out yet. Maybe I won't be able to and I'll just have to do trial and error. The 4 main "out of county" places I work all require a 5 minute drive in suburban traffic before the following:

Site 1 (33 miles total): 15 miles suburban/semi rural driving followed by 16 miles rural driving and about 2 miles of city driving.
Site 2 (64 miles total): 3 miles suburban driving, 56 miles interstate, 5 miles city driving
Site 3 (86 miles total): 3 miles suburban driving, 74 miles interstate, 9 miles city driving
Site 4 (69 miles total): 3 miles suburban driving, 64 miles interstate, 2 miles city driving

None of these sites will I make it on electric alone, but I theorize that the most cost efficient way of doing things is to use electric when gas is least efficient (city driving). So, I'm guessing that to use the least amount of gas (and therefore save as much money as possible at the pump) I should be using electric only at the beginning and end of my drive. Once I get up to speed with cruse control on, switch it to hybrid (or esave?) and then when I get close to my exit, switch it back into electric only. But how do I maximize the amount of battery I am using so that I run out of battery just as I get to work (where I can charge my car)? And would interstate driving be better in hybrid, esave, or does it not matter?

Author's note: Yes, I understand that the easiest would be just to run out the electric on the first portion of my drive and throw it into hybrid after and not worry about it, and that this is likely going to change my cost of my drive by less than $1 at most. Hence why it is a shower thought and not me truly worrying about the answer to the question. And if I weren't sitting here waiting for a meeting to start, none of you guys would even know what I was thinking about for 10 minutes this morning! But alas, I am still here waiting for this meeting to start so now all of your are tortured with thinking about it as well!
You could be just overthinking it.

From what I have gathered, Hybrid mode will still prioritize the electric motor but will kick the gas motor on faster for acceleration purposes. Once you are up to speed in most cases, the ICE will shut off and push you along in electric, kicking on the ICE when needed for whatever you are doing. You will never FULLY run out of battery as there is a buffer built in, brake regen, and a little ICE regen here and there to make sure you are never left limping along with just a small 4 cyl Turbo ICE motor trying to merge you into traffic. This is probably the mode you will find less headache about putting too much thought about it and just leaving it here and going.

Electric will only use as much electric and delay as much as possible the use of the ICE, but if you need to accelerate hard, it WILL start the ICE and scoot you to a point where it decided that you are now safe to go back on to all electric. Again, you will never FULLY run out of batter because of the buffer built in.

E-Save mode is the opposite of the electric mode. The gas engine will stay running to run your AC or whatever else you have on, and if you are heading to a trail or want to keep as much electric range available at your destination, it will try and use as little electricity as possible. With setting changes, you can also select it to help generate some extra juice for your battery. Again, if you need to accelerate, it will use the full availability of the system and combine both ICE and electric to get you up to where you need.

None of the selections will fully disable one system or the other.

Someone like @Roy Hobbs, who has theirs in the driveway, might be able to answer this better, but this is everything I have gathered from as much media/information consumption as I have been able to
 

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Most of my driving is 6-12 mile trips taking my kids to and from school/sports/etc, in those cases I leave it in electric.
Anything that will hit out side of the electric range or highway I plan to leave it in hybrid. I only plan to use e-save to burn through some gas here and there. No clue if this is right or wrong.

I'm sure the Wrangler 4xe guys have way more info on this
 

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I'm sure the Wrangler 4xe guys have way more info on this
Here's my personal strategy of what I do in my 4xe.


First and foremost, always prioritize arriving where you're going to be charging with an empty battery. You never want to use the ice and still have charge when you get where you're going if economy is your goal.

I use electric or hybrid around town. I very rarely trigger the ice while driving in hybrid in the city, so I don't worry, but switching to electric isn't a bad idea.

I switch to esave hold on the highway, if I'm going to be doing driving in the city after that I want to be in electric.

If I have extra range, I'll switch to electric on the highway before I get off.


My daily commute looks like this:

4 miles in electric in town.
Switch to eSave when I get on the highway. About 4 miles on the highway.
Switch to electric when I get off the highway. About 12 miles off the highway.

Arrive at work, no charging available.

Leave work in electric, about 6 miles in electric.

Hop on the highway, switch to esave. About 10 miles on the highway. A mile before I get off, I switch to electric. Another 4 miles or so from the highway to my house. I usually run out of battery about as I pull into my driveway, after about 27 miles of electric use.

This method minimizes the total amount of fuel used for me.
 

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Here's my personal strategy of what I do in my 4xe.


First and foremost, always prioritize arriving where you're going to be charging with an empty battery. You never want to use the ice and still have charge when you get where you're going if economy is your goal.

I use electric or hybrid around town. I very rarely trigger the ice while driving in hybrid in the city, so I don't worry, but switching to electric isn't a bad idea.

I switch to esave hold on the highway, if I'm going to be doing driving in the city after that I want to be in electric.

If I have extra range, I'll switch to electric on the highway before I get off.


My daily commute looks like this:

4 miles in electric in town.
Switch to eSave when I get on the highway. About 4 miles on the highway.
Switch to electric when I get off the highway. About 12 miles off the highway.

Arrive at work, no charging available.

Leave work in electric, about 6 miles in electric.

Hop on the highway, switch to esave. About 10 miles on the highway. A mile before I get off, I switch to electric. Another 4 miles or so from the highway to my house. I usually run out of battery about as I pull into my driveway, after about 27 miles of electric use.

This method minimizes the total amount of fuel used for me.
So in hybrid mode, it will run on electric only unless more power is needed, at which time it will automatically kick in the ICE? Isn't that what e-only does as well? What is the difference, then, of the two modes?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Your driving habits are not really suited for a PHEV, unless you want to keep constantly fiddling with the buttons, leave it in Hybrid.
100% agree that the 2 long drives I make each week are NOT the use cases for a PHEV. I'm going to get the most bang for my buck when I'm doing short errand trips around town, or when I am responding (with emergency lights and sirens) to the firehouse or the scene of an emergency (which is DEFINITELY NOT fuel efficient to be accelerating and braking as often as I do). I'm curious as to how much I'll save in gas fiddling with electric and hybrid mode vs just leaving it in hybrid on those long drives...

“Configuration”?
Something about having to take it out of "shipping mode?" This is my first time I didn't buy a car that was already on a lot for me to test drive (I was going to order one, but they had a dealer order for basically the exact car I was looking for so they convinced me to put a down payment on that one instead), but it seems like there's some stuff to be done before the vehicle is ready for sale? They apparently got like 7 trucks worth of cars in this week so they can't get everyone's configured in the usual 24 hours they say. Since I'm working a lot this week, I told them I'd be happy for my to be lower on the priority list in exchange for not charging me any storage fees if my schedule falls through and I can't get to picking it up until next week or the week after.
 

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So in hybrid mode, it will run on electric only unless more power is needed, at which time it will automatically kick in the ICE? Isn't that what e-only does as well? What is the difference, then, of the two modes?
From my understanding when in electric only mode, you pretty much have to floor the accelerator pedal to get the ICE to kick on. In hybrid mode the threshold is probably closer to half throttle.
 

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So in hybrid mode, it will run on electric only unless more power is needed, at which time it will automatically kick in the ICE? Isn't that what e-only does as well? What is the difference, then, of the two modes?
I think it changes at what point the ICE or the Electric kicks in. From what I have read and gathered from reading as much as I can, you can't fully disable one system or the other.
 
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So in hybrid mode, it will run on electric only unless more power is needed, at which time it will automatically kick in the ICE? Isn't that what e-only does as well? What is the difference, then, of the two modes
In hybrid, when there is charge in the battery, if the ice comes on, you get a larger amount of energy coming from the electric motors during steady state driving.

In other words, if you're in e-save on the highway at steady state, 100% of your power is coming from the ice. The electric motors will provide additional power to accelerate, however, your steady state power draw is from the ice. In hybrid (assuming sufficient battery charge), about 65% of the power comes from the ice, 35% from the electric motor.

At first glance, this seems like a great way to save fuel (you'll see lots of discussion on M8 mode as a way of forcing this behavior). The issue is, you'll use less total gas if you part of your drive 100% on ice and part 100% on electric than you will doing the whole drive 65/35 split, even though your instantaneous fuel economy is worse when you're using 100% ice.
 

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So in hybrid mode, it will run on electric only unless more power is needed, at which time it will automatically kick in the ICE? Isn't that what e-only does as well? What is the difference, then, of the two modes?
One thing that is not discussed enough is the terrain that you are travelling on.
If we leave ours in Hybrid mode to travel locally to town the ICE will start no matter how delicately the accelerator is depressed when going up inclines, in Electric mode the ICE never runs. (unless we exceed the battery range)
My SR 4xe hit the dealer lot earlier this week, it's scheduled to undergo configuration tomorrow, and the earliest I am free to pick it up is Sunday. As such, I've been getting some random shower thoughts about driving it. Most I could answer by looking things up, but here's one where after doing a bunch of reading, I am actually MORE confused than before! (To be fair, most of my reading was done on the Wranger forums since there is not a lot about this topic for GC's just yet).

The way I understand it (please correct me if I am wrong) is:
1. Hybrid mode - this is where you want to leave it most of the time for longer trips, all other things being equal (see below). It runs both the gas and electric engine and maximizes efficiency of both.
2. Electric - runs electric only. This is where you want to leave it for shorter trips (going to the grocery store etc) under the 26 mile mark.
3. e-save - runs gas only. Only to be used in special situations where you want/need to run gas only. For example, you want to run electric only when you get to your destination for some reason.

I have fairly long commutes to the different sites I work at most days, and here's where the shower thoughts kicked in this morning. Obviously, when I'm just going to and from a local site, I'm going to keep it in electric mode, but it's the longer commutes that I haven't fully reasoned out yet. Maybe I won't be able to and I'll just have to do trial and error. The 4 main "out of county" places I work all require a 5 minute drive in suburban traffic before the following:

Site 1 (33 miles total): 15 miles suburban/semi rural driving followed by 16 miles rural driving and about 2 miles of city driving.
Site 2 (64 miles total): 3 miles suburban driving, 56 miles interstate, 5 miles city driving
Site 3 (86 miles total): 3 miles suburban driving, 74 miles interstate, 9 miles city driving
Site 4 (69 miles total): 3 miles suburban driving, 64 miles interstate, 2 miles city driving

None of these sites will I make it on electric alone, but I theorize that the most cost efficient way of doing things is to use electric when gas is least efficient (city driving). So, I'm guessing that to use the least amount of gas (and therefore save as much money as possible at the pump) I should be using electric only at the beginning and end of my drive. Once I get up to speed with cruse control on, switch it to hybrid (or esave?) and then when I get close to my exit, switch it back into electric only. But how do I maximize the amount of battery I am using so that I run out of battery just as I get to work (where I can charge my car)? And would interstate driving be better in hybrid, esave, or does it not matter?

Author's note: Yes, I understand that the easiest would be just to run out the electric on the first portion of my drive and throw it into hybrid after and not worry about it, and that this is likely going to change my cost of my drive by less than $1 at most. Hence why it is a shower thought and not me truly worrying about the answer to the question. And if I weren't sitting here waiting for a meeting to start, none of you guys would even know what I was thinking about for 10 minutes this morning! But alas, I am still here waiting for this meeting to start so now all of your are tortured with thinking about it as well!
In addition to the above information on terrain I also have recent real world experience:
This past week after doing our local runs we left on an ~120 mile round trip through the mountains with ~33% battery left, I placed it in E-save mode (no charging) and by the time we got off the interstate we had ~51% battery.
We used Electric around town and changed back to E-save for the return trip.
I switched back to Electric when we were closer to home and within 100' of our driveway (on an ~5* grade) the ICE started with the display indicating that the electric was depleted.

My point is just as people with ICE vehicles don't all get the same fuel mileage PHEV owners won't either.
Our 4xe is a Sahara, I would have to believe if we had a GC 4xe our results would have been better.
 

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Just past 1k on mine. Esave on long drives or any expressway driving. Hybrid around town to include my daily hilly commute of 18 miles round trip. Ice almost never comes on. Never used electric only mode.
 

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Something about having to take it out of "shipping mode?"
🙄 (at the dealer, not you). The only thing that takes awhile (and is different than the ICE) is they need to charge it when it arrives. If they got a lot of 4XEs in and have a limited number of chargers, that could be it - otherwise, it going from “shipping mode” to “dealer wants to play with it mode” to “ready for you mode”. I showed up at my dealer around 12:30 or so and left at 6:30 (mostly because I just showed up after I saw they had signed for the truck delivery). They were a bit incredulous that anyone was tracking trucks, but beyond that, its charge, dealer prep, sign and drive. Heck, i got some of the app stuff set up and got the iPhone notification when it was done charging and told the sales guy it was ready for the next step
 

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I haven't gotten mine in yet (fingers crossed fort end of October) but in March my wife and I went to Iceland and drove the entire ring road in a Jeep Compass PHEV. Much shorter all electric range of 17 miles (ish) but it was a really good lesson in how to use the different modes.

When we were in the main cities (Reykjavik, Husavik, etc) we used electric exclusively to get around to the musuems, restaurants, etc. Basically we used all electric for the constant stop and go that really kills fuel economy. When we drove to our next destination on the list we started with Hybrid but quickly realized that for our use case we wanted to use E-save so we would have the battery for driving around the next city. We were often getting in at inconvenient times for charging so the battery savings were key since there is no fast charging on these PHEVs and running gas on the highway is far more fuel efficient than around town.

Having said that I was really shocked how quickly this model ran through the battery BUT the average temp during the day was around 30f and around 20f at night which kills the battery (so I have been told anyway).
 

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when distance is bigger than electric range prioritize city driving in electric. that is about it. meaning you have 5 miles to highway, go electric, on highway energy save, close to destination back to electric..
What would be the suggestion if you live in a metro area where you can be on and off the highway within the electric range when heading to your destination and making it back home? Get up to speed on the highway, switch to E-save for the few miles you are there, and turn back to hybrid when off the highway?

Reference... DC Metro area, easy access to the beltway, and often travel the express lanes a few exits to get to areas like Tysons Corner.
 

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What would be the suggestion if you live in a metro area where you can be on and off the highway within the electric range when heading to your destination and making it back home? Get up to speed on the highway, switch to E-save for the few miles you are there, and turn back to hybrid when off the highway?

Reference... DC Metro area, easy access to the beltway, and often travel the express lanes a few exits to get to areas like Tysons Corner.
In my BMW 45e, when I am on and off the interstate I just keep it in hybrid. Probably going to do the same with the Jeep when it comes in and the BMW goes to the rightful owner, my wife lol
 
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