Jeep Wrangler 4xe Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

Should I charge my 4xe to 80% if I don't use the 4xe every day?

Tesla has an Optimal Charging Limit for an extended period of battery.

I don't see "Optimal Charging Limit" in the 4xe manual.

or
Just charge Full and then if the battery range becomes short, go to the dealer to replace the battery while under the warranty?

Please advise what everyone does.

Any help or insight is appreciated
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,021 Posts
I think we are all too new at ownership to know that. However, there is nothing built in that would do this.

If you keep it plugged in, it will use the climate systems to keep the battery at optimal temperatures. It will also keep the 12V battery conditioned as long as there is enough charge in the 400V battery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
One of the reasons for the 80% things on Tesla’s is due to how much energy it takes to get from 80% to 100%. The internal resistance goes up inside Li-Ion batteries as they get to that last 15% SOC on a non-linear curve. So you can use just as much energy charging that last 20% as you did in the front 80%. If you are just doing normal daily driving, there’s no point using all that extra energy. A road trip is a different story.

Keep in mind, PHEV batteries are different from EV batteries. Not all Li-Ion batteries are the same. Tesla batteries have been made by Panasonic and now made by Tesla in-house where Samsung makes the batteries for the 4XE. Tesla batteries are round cells much like AA batteries where the 4XE uses a more modular, rectangular battery.

Long story short, if the manufacturer doesn’t recommend it, don’t carry over information from another manufacturer. If they haven’t designed a method in to the software to cut it off at 80%, it’s not a concern.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,021 Posts
Yeah, it's definitely a system to not to try and overthink. I've had a few German cars and some of the engineering complexity in the 4xe is impressive in comparison. Sure there are many PHEVs, but this was (for a short time) the fastest Wrangler and even gains in some off road abilities.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Lithium batteries are rated in "cycles". You can easily double or triple the lifespan of your battery by keeping it between 50-80%. If that's reasonable for you to do, you should do so.

Different manufacturers has nothing to do with it. It's the chemistry. LI-ION, LPO, LiPo, etc... will all last longer keeping the battery between 50-80% regardless as to who makes them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
735 Posts
Lithium batteries are rated in "cycles". You can easily double or triple the lifespan of your battery by keeping it between 50-80%. If that's reasonable for you to do, you should do so.

Different manufacturers has nothing to do with it. It's the chemistry. LI-ION, LPO, LiPo, etc... will all last longer keeping the battery between 50-80% regardless as to who makes them.
The BMS in the battery takes care of making sure it's charged properly the % displayed on the screen is not the actual state of charge of the HV battery
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
544 Posts
If I had a level 2 charger I would charge to 90% everytime because I use the 375hp a lot and 90% or below is the only way to force the engine to run in esave (except putting it in manual mode but manual mode sucks)

plus I’m sure there is a little bit of battery life increase only charging to 90%
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
544 Posts
One of the reasons for the 80% things on Tesla’s is due to how much energy it takes to get from 80% to 100%. The internal resistance goes up inside Li-Ion batteries as they get to that last 15% SOC on a non-linear curve. So you can use just as much energy charging that last 20% as you did in the front 80%..
i have never heard that before

I thought it took extra time, not energy.

How sure of that are you? Like 90% or 100%?

Don’t feel like researching lol, so if you say 100% that’s good enough for me. I just have it in my head reason the charging slowed down is because charging is equalizing voltages. IE the charger is supplying 400 volts, it charges until the battery voltage equalizes at 400v. So in essence if the charger is 400 volts, and the battery has reached 395 volts, then the charging slows down because it’s only excepting X amps @ 5v.

I just didn’t think it took anymore raw energy to charge the last 20%, just that it took longer. I could be wrong though.

(i mostly just enjoy discussing the subject, not calling you out)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,091 Posts
i have never heard that before

I thought it took extra time, not energy.

How sure of that are you? Like 90% or 100%?
We can pretty easily disprove it.

Car and Driver has done testing on just this, showing 99% efficiency dc fast charging on their local supercharger with worst case scenarios being 90% efficiency on other fast chargers.


If it actually takes as much energy to charge from 80% to 100% as it does from 0% to 80%, than the DC fast charging efficiency would be in the low 60% range.


Now, time wise with the kW input throttled due to thermal management and taking as long to go from 80-100 as 0-80 is totally legit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
@Tyler-98-W68 that sounds feasible to me. Charging to 100% would kill the battery a lot faster than 93%. Still a tiny bit high (I would think 90% max at any chemistry, and I wish it would let you configure this yourself), but still an awful lot better than 100%!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,091 Posts
What's interesting is tends to do that if you start at a low state of charge, but not as much if you start at a higher state of charge. Probably has something to do with regulating the temperature when increasing the charge at a high state of charge and the battery already being hot if it's been charging for a while.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top