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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After driving the Wrangler 4XE for a while, I've started to create a mental image of how I perceive the software prioritizes power use. There's a lot going on in the software. The amount of code must be amazing. This is nothing official and I have no access to the actual data. I have just been observing the power flow screen as I drive and have attempted to give it a graphic representation of what I see the vehicle doing.
One primary thing to understand is that the Wrangler 4XE is always a hybrid. I'll say it again: The Wrangler 4XE is always a hybrid. It is always working to maximize efficiency while maintaining power.

In hybrid mode when the battery is charged, the vehicle places a high priority on operating in all electric but will add the gas engine for added power when there is a demand. If the driver pushes the accelerator pedal just a little bit more than "normal" when leaving a stop sign, the gas engine will kick on to respond to driver input.
In Hybrid Mode when the battery is depleted to the "<1%" point the vehicle becomes more like a non-plug-in hybrid. It's primary source of propulsion is the gas engine but it uses the electric motors when possible. It maintains a state of charge around 15% that is hidden from view by the indicator on the dash. The vehicle will recapture energy when decelerating or going down hills via regeneration. Even with Max Regen turned off, the vehicle still regenerates when possible. It will also lightly charge via either the eTorque motor/generator or the Traction motor/generator in the hybrid transmission.

In Electric Mode, the vehicle places a high priority on operating on electric only but will turn on the gas engine when there is a power demand. Remember, it is always a hybrid. As such, Jeep has balanced efficiency and performance. While the gas engine will not kick on under the same kind of demand rate as when in Hybrid mode, the driver can still get the gas engine to kick on if they place a high enough demand on the system.

The e-Save mode is possibly the most misunderstood mode of the vehicle. Let me restate the phrase that the Wrangler 4XE is always a hybrid before I go on. In e-Save mode, the operator has a choice between Battery Save and Battery Charge. With battery save mode, we might believe that it places the Wrangler 4XE is "Gas Mode" and the battery just sits there. By observing the power flow screen in the Uconnect, we can see that this isn't the case. The battery is still made available for hybrid operation but it's application is lessened. Much like how the vehicle maintains the battery at 15% in the background when the SOC indicator hits <1%, the vehicle will maintain the battery at whatever the state of charge is when e-Save is selected. It will still use it but it will work to replenish to that state when and where possible. When in e-Save plus Battery Charge, the vehicle will again still use the battery for propulsion but it will work harder to charge the battery as well. Unlike Battery Save where it will only maintain a set state of charge, it will continue to charge the battery until it is full. From an overall efficiency perspective, this mode is the least efficient due to the added work load to the gas engine. When the 2 motor-generators are charging, they place an additional mechanical load on the gas engine on top of rolling the vehicle down the road.
265

I have so much respect for the decisions the vehicle has been programmed to make. What we have to understand is that there is a spectrum upon which a hybrid system can operate. At one end of that spectrum is performance and at the other end is efficiency. Jeep has attempted to maintain both performance and efficiency in the Wrangler 4XE and that is no small task with a vehicle that weighs 5,000 pounds, is trail rated and has the drag coefficient of a dump truck. But from what I can see, they have done it very well.
I would appreciate any feedback on this analysis. If my graphic is miscommunications something, please let me know so it can be made better. I wanted to create something to help others understand what the vehicle is doing in the various modes. It's a concept that I struggle to communicate since I really lack the true vocabulary and expertise to explain well.
 

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I'm a software engineer/architect, and I love deep diving into anything technical, so I dig on this sort of analysis :)

Short version: I'd say you're right on.

Even though we haven't had ours long (or put many miles on it), I've been using the various gauges, data screens to keep a pretty close eye on what's happening during driving, in various modes. One thing told the wife pretty quickly, is that regardless of the mode, the ICE can be prompted to engage, always, it's never totally turned off - the mode affects the amount of bias between the ICE and EV systems, and it =feels= like it changes the engagement point as well (though in all cases, if you go WOT, it switches on).

One thing I'd point out to people reading this, the two e-Save modes, i.e., Battery Save and Battery Charge, are set in the center stack, under Apps >> eSave, and the default is Battery Save (see post above for excellent description of the two).

I read you have another EV [?] I might eventually replace my GT convertible (since how we have another convertible capable ride) with a BEV, probably a Model 3 Performance, but was wondering about your other vehicle (sorry if that's slightly off topic :D)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm a software engineer/architect, and I love deep diving into anything technical, so I dig on this sort of analysis :)

Short version: I'd say you're right on.

Even though we haven't had ours long (or put many miles on it), I've been using the various gauges, data screens to keep a pretty close eye on what's happening during driving, in various modes. One thing told the wife pretty quickly, is that regardless of the mode, the ICE can be prompted to engage, always, it's never totally turned off - the mode affects the amount of bias between the ICE and EV systems, and it =feels= like it changes the engagement point as well (though in all cases, if you go WOT, it switches on).

One thing I'd point out to people reading this, the two e-Save modes, i.e., Battery Save and Battery Charge, are set in the center stack, under Apps >> eSave, and the default is Battery Save (see post above for excellent description of the two).

I read you have another EV [?] I might eventually replace my GT convertible (since how we have another convertible capable ride) with a BEV, probably a Model 3 Performance, but was wondering about your other vehicle (sorry if that's slightly off topic :D)
I had a Smart Electric Drive for about 4.5 years. It was a great little car and super economical. My estimated spending was about $25 a month on my electric bill. It was super fun to drive too. I would have kept it around but we have 4 cars in our family as it is. My sons are at the age where they are pretty expensive to insure so keeping a 5th car just for the fun of it carried a price tag.
 

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Excellent analysis.

Two questions, both deriving from the notion that hybrid mode is always most efficient. 1. If I'm going to be driving less than 20 miles per day and recharge every night, is electric mode more efficient than hybrid mode? 2. If I'm taking a long drive (say 500 miles), which is best after the battery depletes: e-save with charge or hybrid?

A third question. What are the benefits, if any, of using e-save with Battery Save instead of Battery Charge?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Excellent analysis.

Two questions, both deriving from the notion that hybrid mode is always most efficient. 1. If I'm going to be driving less than 20 miles per day and recharge every night, is electric mode more efficient than hybrid mode? 2. If I'm taking a long drive (say 500 miles), which is best after the battery depletes: e-save with charge or hybrid?

A third question. What are the benefits, if any, of using e-save with Battery Save instead of Battery Charge?
You’re right on with 1. Electric mode is super for daily driving. Electric is always cheaper and cleaner.

On long trips, hybrid mode is the best pick.
E-Save is the most inefficient way to operate the vehicle and I would never use it on a long trip. The only time I would use it is if I was driving somewhere and wanted to save the battery until I got there. Or, let’s say you drive a long distance then want to use the electric mode once I got there and you wouldn’t have a chance to charge. I might run eSave for the last part of the trip.
 

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We took ours out for a little trip to pickup an order, up into the main city proper (we're in Vilano Beach), left it on H, 4WD control I've left in 4H AUTO, started with ~88% battery. Other than a couple of WOT runs (this thing cracks me up ... :D), I had the gauge up that shows EV vs. ICE, and it was only on battery, came through the old city (so fun, being so quiet), got home with ~43%.

We added our first gas, the dealer delivered it was about 60% of a tank, and I had no idea about what they used, so I topped it off with some good Sunoco 93 (the manual indicates 87 is fine, and for "better performance/mileage" use 91). FYI, I've been involved in tuning performance cars for some time and have tested a number of gases around town: Shell, BP and Sunoco is the most octane consistent (I also run Ethanol in my GT :) )

Anyway, I expect this tank of gas to last a long time :) It was a hoot watching the MPG go UP, from 36.x to 38 during our short trip. Tomorrow, I'm going to get a beach pass, can't wait to experience this on the beach, silent ...
 

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You’re right on with 1. Electric mode is super for daily driving. Electric is always cheaper and cleaner.

On long trips, hybrid mode is the best pick.
E-Save is the most inefficient way to operate the vehicle and I would never use it on a long trip. The only time I would use it is if I was driving somewhere and wanted to save the battery until I got there. Or, let’s say you drive a long distance then want to use the electric mode once I got there and you wouldn’t have a chance to charge. I might run eSave for the last part of the trip.
Thanks for the insight.

Any thoughts on Battery Charge vs Battery Save?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
We took ours out for a little trip to pickup an order, up into the main city proper (we're in Vilano Beach), left it on H, 4WD control I've left in 4H AUTO, started with ~88% battery. Other than a couple of WOT runs (this thing cracks me up ... :D), I had the gauge up that shows EV vs. ICE, and it was only on battery, came through the old city (so fun, being so quiet), got home with ~43%.

We added our first gas, the dealer delivered it was about 60% of a tank, and I had no idea about what they used, so I topped it off with some good Sunoco 93 (the manual indicates 87 is fine, and for "better performance/mileage" use 91). FYI, I've been involved in tuning performance cars for some time and have tested a number of gases around town: Shell, BP and Sunoco is the most octane consistent (I also run Ethanol in my GT :) )

Anyway, I expect this tank of gas to last a long time :) It was a hoot watching the MPG go UP, from 36.x to 38 during our short trip. Tomorrow, I'm going to get a beach pass, can't wait to experience this on the beach, silent ...
I’m planning on running my current tank really low then doing a fill up of some higher octane for some gas milage and 0-60 tests. Do you think 93 is too high? Should I just stick with 91?
 

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Funny, I was noticing this today as we are trying to break in the engine, but hasn't been running much. Last night it ran the battery from 100 to 0 on the way home from delivery at the dealer. #fail

Trying e-Save mode for now.
 

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I’m planning on running my current tank really low then doing a fill up of some higher octane for some gas milage and 0-60 tests. Do you think 93 is too high? Should I just stick with 91?
Generally the max spec is all you need, though I've been surprised at the measured spec being a little less than the number on the pump. Generally modern cars can make use of improved octane, but only up to a point, based on the static/dynamic C/R, fuel tables, etc., and as long as it's hitting the requirement to prevent pre-ignition - so 93 is "over kill" so to speak - though you would for sure know you're getting at_least a good solid 91, and in my case, I was blending with an existing who knows octane (I'd kind of assume the cheapest gas for a 120 mile delivery :D).

Also, in my neck of the woods, it's 87 - 89 - 93, most stations in my larger travel area don't carry 91 (it was always fun to see 91, 92 and even 94 in some states like PA). We do have a Sunoco really close that carries 104 octane "race gas", it's $9.99/gallon :D

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After driving the Wrangler 4XE for a while, I've started to create a mental image of how I perceive the software prioritizes power use. There's a lot going on in the software. The amount of code must be amazing. This is nothing official and I have no access to the actual data. I have just been observing the power flow screen as I drive and have attempted to give it a graphic representation of what I see the vehicle doing.
One primary thing to understand is that the Wrangler 4XE is always a hybrid. I'll say it again: The Wrangler 4XE is always a hybrid. It is always working to maximize efficiency while maintaining power.

In hybrid mode when the battery is charged, the vehicle places a high priority on operating in all electric but will add the gas engine for added power when there is a demand. If the driver pushes the accelerator pedal just a little bit more than "normal" when leaving a stop sign, the gas engine will kick on to respond to driver input.
In Hybrid Mode when the battery is depleted to the "<1%" point the vehicle becomes more like a non-plug-in hybrid. It's primary source of propulsion is the gas engine but it uses the electric motors when possible. It maintains a state of charge around 15% that is hidden from view by the indicator on the dash. The vehicle will recapture energy when decelerating or going down hills via regeneration. Even with Max Regen turned off, the vehicle still regenerates when possible. It will also lightly charge via either the eTorque motor/generator or the Traction motor/generator in the hybrid transmission.

In Electric Mode, the vehicle places a high priority on operating on electric only but will turn on the gas engine when there is a power demand. Remember, it is always a hybrid. As such, Jeep has balanced efficiency and performance. While the gas engine will not kick on under the same kind of demand rate as when in Hybrid mode, the driver can still get the gas engine to kick on if they place a high enough demand on the system.

The e-Save mode is possibly the most misunderstood mode of the vehicle. Let me restate the phrase that the Wrangler 4XE is always a hybrid before I go on. In e-Save mode, the operator has a choice between Battery Save and Battery Charge. With battery save mode, we might believe that it places the Wrangler 4XE is "Gas Mode" and the battery just sits there. By observing the power flow screen in the Uconnect, we can see that this isn't the case. The battery is still made available for hybrid operation but it's application is lessened. Much like how the vehicle maintains the battery at 15% in the background when the SOC indicator hits <1%, the vehicle will maintain the battery at whatever the state of charge is when e-Save is selected. It will still use it but it will work to replenish to that state when and where possible. When in e-Save plus Battery Charge, the vehicle will again still use the battery for propulsion but it will work harder to charge the battery as well. Unlike Battery Save where it will only maintain a set state of charge, it will continue to charge the battery until it is full. From an overall efficiency perspective, this mode is the least efficient due to the added work load to the gas engine. When the 2 motor-generators are charging, they place an additional mechanical load on the gas engine on top of rolling the vehicle down the road.
View attachment 265
I have so much respect for the decisions the vehicle has been programmed to make. What we have to understand is that there is a spectrum upon which a hybrid system can operate. At one end of that spectrum is performance and at the other end is efficiency. Jeep has attempted to maintain both performance and efficiency in the Wrangler 4XE and that is no small task with a vehicle that weighs 5,000 pounds, is trail rated and has the drag coefficient of a dump truck. But from what I can see, they have done it very well.
I would appreciate any feedback on this analysis. If my graphic is miscommunications something, please let me know so it can be made better. I wanted to create something to help others understand what the vehicle is doing in the various modes. It's a concept that I struggle to communicate since I really lack the true vocabulary and expertise to explain well.
I really appreciate your review. Very nice! I've been attempting to read gauges and review different scenarios all while trying to stay in my lane, no small task I must say. I really like the Regen charging as it reminds me of my old RV jake brake days.

So I'd appreciate everyone's thoughts. Hang in there, I'm almost to my point . . . I'm building a house in the mountains while renting in the flat lands and the elevation change is > 2000 ft. over a 25 mile severely winding two lane road. Obviously I burn up battery heading up the hill in hybrid mode. Coming back down I can literally use only Regen and no braking with my feet (admit to some strategic planning) and gain back 15% battery. Please give me your thoughts on the following options to optimize mpg;

1. Leave it in Hybrid mode with Regen all the way back down to the flat land
2. Leave it in Hybrid mode without Regen all the way back down to the flat land
3. Put it in e-save Battery Save with Regen until I reach the flat land and switch back to Hybrid
4. Put it in e-save Battery Charge with Regen until I reach the flat land and switch back to Hybrid
5. Other

Truly appreciate everyone's thoughts . . .
 

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I have a few more data points, (er, really sort of "data", since there's a touch of guesswork ...)

Scenario 1

We took the 4XE out for a couple of errands, left fully charged, full tank of gas, Hybrid mode, ~19 miles (according to G-maps, took the 10 mile there, and the 8.9 mile back through the Old City), also had a small detour at the start, I'm sure that was 1/10th of a mile, so I rounded up :)

Stood on it a few times, but mostly can pretty easily regular the throttle to keep it in electric only mode, also running on Max Regen (coming down off bridges it gets a pretty good charge indication).

This is probably split about 50/50 with 35 and 45MPH driving, and one tiny around of 55 (like mile at most).

Arrived home with over 40%, I want to say 42/43%. Now clearly, that's a good bit better than the EPA estimate (21), or even the original Jeep estimate (25), I mean, a simple mathematical projection, would suggest another 13 or so miles from the remaining charge (assuming a reasonably linear consumption rate), putting 35-45MPH city, stop and go at a touch over 30 miles on a charge ... ?

I assume those other consumption rates are some kind of blended use that include highway (i.e., 70MPH+ where the aerodynamics really come into play).


Scenario 2

Took it down the BIL's place in NSB, ~170 miles.

Left with 100%, Max Regen, a line under full gas in the tank. About 20 miles into the trip, I decided I wanted to make sure I arrived with some juice, so I switched over to E-Save, and I also have that mode configured to Battery Charge, i.e., it's actually burning a little extra gas to charge.

Took it around the corner to the club, maybe 2-3 miles, then out to eat. Stood on it several times headed down to a Mexican restaurant, that's ~10 miles from his house (he's west of 95 on 44), about 50/50 35MPH and 55MPH, ate (it was awesome as always :D), back to his house.

I took the portable charger (the Level 1 that's included), I was thinking of taking our Level 2, but that thing is a beast, huge heavy cables, big box, etc., hahaha, it's not very "portable", though if I was staying somewhere where we were driving a lot for like several days, I might take it.

So it got an overnight charge, almost full, like 96%.

Drive directly home, on 95 we were doing a pretty constant "few over" :) At that speed, in H mode, the battery and ICE were constantly working together, had the ACC on, so the speed was pretty well regulated, tops in, windows up (so best case aero ...). I'm assuming the speed + wind (super windy) required both systems working together to sustain the MPH, but interesting in that is was more in a traditional PHEV mode. I'm not 100% sure when we went ICE only, but the battery lasted a long time (again, which is a little different than I expected).

So a straight up MPG calc of ~8g used for 170 miles is ~21MPG, but I think it's a little more complex, pure ICE in battery recharge mode for ~65 miles, some frisky driving around town, Max Reg most of the time, also running in 4H AUTO mode, not sure if there's any MPG advantage to 2H mode[?]

Oh yeah, so the 55-65 miles on E-save + Battery charge, at 70-ish on the highway, we picked up about 14-15% charge (IIRC).

Very cool.
 

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After driving the Wrangler 4XE for a while, I've started to create a mental image of how I perceive the software prioritizes power use. There's a lot going on in the software. The amount of code must be amazing. This is nothing official and I have no access to the actual data. I have just been observing the power flow screen as I drive and have attempted to give it a graphic representation of what I see the vehicle doing.
One primary thing to understand is that the Wrangler 4XE is always a hybrid. I'll say it again: The Wrangler 4XE is always a hybrid. It is always working to maximize efficiency while maintaining power.

In hybrid mode when the battery is charged, the vehicle places a high priority on operating in all electric but will add the gas engine for added power when there is a demand. If the driver pushes the accelerator pedal just a little bit more than "normal" when leaving a stop sign, the gas engine will kick on to respond to driver input.
In Hybrid Mode when the battery is depleted to the "<1%" point the vehicle becomes more like a non-plug-in hybrid. It's primary source of propulsion is the gas engine but it uses the electric motors when possible. It maintains a state of charge around 15% that is hidden from view by the indicator on the dash. The vehicle will recapture energy when decelerating or going down hills via regeneration. Even with Max Regen turned off, the vehicle still regenerates when possible. It will also lightly charge via either the eTorque motor/generator or the Traction motor/generator in the hybrid transmission.

In Electric Mode, the vehicle places a high priority on operating on electric only but will turn on the gas engine when there is a power demand. Remember, it is always a hybrid. As such, Jeep has balanced efficiency and performance. While the gas engine will not kick on under the same kind of demand rate as when in Hybrid mode, the driver can still get the gas engine to kick on if they place a high enough demand on the system.

The e-Save mode is possibly the most misunderstood mode of the vehicle. Let me restate the phrase that the Wrangler 4XE is always a hybrid before I go on. In e-Save mode, the operator has a choice between Battery Save and Battery Charge. With battery save mode, we might believe that it places the Wrangler 4XE is "Gas Mode" and the battery just sits there. By observing the power flow screen in the Uconnect, we can see that this isn't the case. The battery is still made available for hybrid operation but it's application is lessened. Much like how the vehicle maintains the battery at 15% in the background when the SOC indicator hits <1%, the vehicle will maintain the battery at whatever the state of charge is when e-Save is selected. It will still use it but it will work to replenish to that state when and where possible. When in e-Save plus Battery Charge, the vehicle will again still use the battery for propulsion but it will work harder to charge the battery as well. Unlike Battery Save where it will only maintain a set state of charge, it will continue to charge the battery until it is full. From an overall efficiency perspective, this mode is the least efficient due to the added work load to the gas engine. When the 2 motor-generators are charging, they place an additional mechanical load on the gas engine on top of rolling the vehicle down the road.
View attachment 265
I have so much respect for the decisions the vehicle has been programmed to make. What we have to understand is that there is a spectrum upon which a hybrid system can operate. At one end of that spectrum is performance and at the other end is efficiency. Jeep has attempted to maintain both performance and efficiency in the Wrangler 4XE and that is no small task with a vehicle that weighs 5,000 pounds, is trail rated and has the drag coefficient of a dump truck. But from what I can see, they have done it very well.
I would appreciate any feedback on this analysis. If my graphic is miscommunications something, please let me know so it can be made better. I wanted to create something to help others understand what the vehicle is doing in the various modes. It's a concept that I struggle to communicate since I really lack the true vocabulary and expertise to explain well.
 

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I'd really like to know how much gas gets expended in say, a 10 mile trip in hybrid mode starting with a fully charged battery. I've had my Jeep 4xe for only 3 days and I'm feeling like I bought the wrong vehicle. We raise horses. I wanted something that would handle difficult roads pulling an aluminum 2 horse trailer or take 1-2 canoes on the roll bars. I do not off road for the joy of kicking up dust.
It is really important to me to use less fuel. Also, the 300 mile range...what does that mean? 300 miles = 20 on electric and the rest on pure gas? I'm seeing 18-20 mpg and it's making me crazy.
 

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I'd really like to know how much gas gets expended in say, a 10 mile trip in hybrid mode starting with a fully charged battery. I've had my Jeep 4xe for only 3 days and I'm feeling like I bought the wrong vehicle. We raise horses. I wanted something that would handle difficult roads pulling an aluminum 2 horse trailer or take 1-2 canoes on the roll bars. I do not off road for the joy of kicking up dust.
It is really important to me to use less fuel. Also, the 300 mile range...what does that mean? 300 miles = 20 on electric and the rest on pure gas? I'm seeing 18-20 mpg and it's making me crazy.
It's better than you think.

So far I've driven 300 miles and my tank is still more than half full from the amount the dealer filled. The range estimate is deceptive if you regularly take short trips, especially if you use electric mode. I drive about 20 miles per day, mostly on electric. On all electric, the gas range doesn't change, and I simply recharge the battery daily.

I find that the hybrid mode gets similar results on city streets, but on the highway the gas kicks in.

For you, it might depend on whether you need the extra power the hybrid gives over just electric.

P.S. Re the 18-20, it probably will rise as you log more miles. When I started, the indicator read 15 avg mpg; it keeps as I drive more (I'm up to 25 mpg now and still rising). Although I really don't understand how it is even that low, given that I've driven 300 miles on less than half a tank.
 

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Hi! Picked up a 4xe Rubicon for my wife, to celebrate our 25th anniversary. I appreciate this thread a ton, very good info.

we were wondering if the default drive modes can be changed? Is there a way we can start out in battery mode with max regen, or do we have to push those buttons each time?

thanks!
 

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Hi! Picked up a 4xe Rubicon for my wife, to celebrate our 25th anniversary. I appreciate this thread a ton, very good info.

we were wondering if the default drive modes can be changed? Is there a way we can start out in battery mode with max regen, or do we have to push those buttons each time?

thanks!
Not that Im aware. HUGE oversight IMO, at least on max regen — unless you are telling me it is less efficient (or they want to sell more brakes.

Maybe the Tazer can do it in time.

Z Automotive Tazer Mini Programmer - Compatible with Jeep Wrangler JL and Gladiator JT 2018-2021 https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B08QW7FGL7
 

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@Wrangler4XEFan I've been watching your videos, thanks for all your work and analysis.

Given that you seem to have a lot of experience with the 4xe, wondering if you've experienced an extremely loud whining engine (gas engine) noise in the first mile or so of driving, particularly when stopped at stop signs or lights. I've had my 4xe for a week, and it's done this a few times. It seems like the system is putting the engine into overdrive to charge it, but if it's supposed to maintain a 15% reserve charge, it feels like it probably should never get to this point where it's overworking to charge the battery and should rely on braking and deceleration to accomplish this. Still getting used to driving a hybrid and wondering if this is normal or something that needs to be addressed! For context, still only 227 miles on the vehicle.
 

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I have a few more data points, (er, really sort of "data", since there's a touch of guesswork ...)

Scenario 1

We took the 4XE out for a couple of errands, left fully charged, full tank of gas, Hybrid mode, ~19 miles (according to G-maps, took the 10 mile there, and the 8.9 mile back through the Old City), also had a small detour at the start, I'm sure that was 1/10th of a mile, so I rounded up :)

Stood on it a few times, but mostly can pretty easily regular the throttle to keep it in electric only mode, also running on Max Regen (coming down off bridges it gets a pretty good charge indication).

This is probably split about 50/50 with 35 and 45MPH driving, and one tiny around of 55 (like mile at most).

Arrived home with over 40%, I want to say 42/43%. Now clearly, that's a good bit better than the EPA estimate (21), or even the original Jeep estimate (25), I mean, a simple mathematical projection, would suggest another 13 or so miles from the remaining charge (assuming a reasonably linear consumption rate), putting 35-45MPH city, stop and go at a touch over 30 miles on a charge ... ?

I assume those other consumption rates are some kind of blended use that include highway (i.e., 70MPH+ where the aerodynamics really come into play).


Scenario 2

Took it down the BIL's place in NSB, ~170 miles.

Left with 100%, Max Regen, a line under full gas in the tank. About 20 miles into the trip, I decided I wanted to make sure I arrived with some juice, so I switched over to E-Save, and I also have that mode configured to Battery Charge, i.e., it's actually burning a little extra gas to charge.

Took it around the corner to the club, maybe 2-3 miles, then out to eat. Stood on it several times headed down to a Mexican restaurant, that's ~10 miles from his house (he's west of 95 on 44), about 50/50 35MPH and 55MPH, ate (it was awesome as always :D), back to his house.

I took the portable charger (the Level 1 that's included), I was thinking of taking our Level 2, but that thing is a beast, huge heavy cables, big box, etc., hahaha, it's not very "portable", though if I was staying somewhere where we were driving a lot for like several days, I might take it.

So it got an overnight charge, almost full, like 96%.

Drive directly home, on 95 we were doing a pretty constant "few over" :) At that speed, in H mode, the battery and ICE were constantly working together, had the ACC on, so the speed was pretty well regulated, tops in, windows up (so best case aero ...). I'm assuming the speed + wind (super windy) required both systems working together to sustain the MPH, but interesting in that is was more in a traditional PHEV mode. I'm not 100% sure when we went ICE only, but the battery lasted a long time (again, which is a little different than I expected).

So a straight up MPG calc of ~8g used for 170 miles is ~21MPG, but I think it's a little more complex, pure ICE in battery recharge mode for ~65 miles, some frisky driving around town, Max Reg most of the time, also running in 4H AUTO mode, not sure if there's any MPG advantage to 2H mode[?]

Oh yeah, so the 55-65 miles on E-save + Battery charge, at 70-ish on the highway, we picked up about 14-15% charge (IIRC).

Very cool.
" also running in 4H AUTO mode, not sure if there's any MPG advantage to 2H mode[?]" I would also like to know this. In addition to best MPH setting, what is the best setting for a standing 0-60?
I have a few more data points, (er, really sort of "data", since there's a touch of guesswork ...)

Scenario 1

We took the 4XE out for a couple of errands, left fully charged, full tank of gas, Hybrid mode, ~19 miles (according to G-maps, took the 10 mile there, and the 8.9 mile back through the Old City), also had a small detour at the start, I'm sure that was 1/10th of a mile, so I rounded up :)

Stood on it a few times, but mostly can pretty easily regular the throttle to keep it in electric only mode, also running on Max Regen (coming down off bridges it gets a pretty good charge indication).

This is probably split about 50/50 with 35 and 45MPH driving, and one tiny around of 55 (like mile at most).

Arrived home with over 40%, I want to say 42/43%. Now clearly, that's a good bit better than the EPA estimate (21), or even the original Jeep estimate (25), I mean, a simple mathematical projection, would suggest another 13 or so miles from the remaining charge (assuming a reasonably linear consumption rate), putting 35-45MPH city, stop and go at a touch over 30 miles on a charge ... ?

I assume those other consumption rates are some kind of blended use that include highway (i.e., 70MPH+ where the aerodynamics really come into play).


Scenario 2

Took it down the BIL's place in NSB, ~170 miles.

Left with 100%, Max Regen, a line under full gas in the tank. About 20 miles into the trip, I decided I wanted to make sure I arrived with some juice, so I switched over to E-Save, and I also have that mode configured to Battery Charge, i.e., it's actually burning a little extra gas to charge.

Took it around the corner to the club, maybe 2-3 miles, then out to eat. Stood on it several times headed down to a Mexican restaurant, that's ~10 miles from his house (he's west of 95 on 44), about 50/50 35MPH and 55MPH, ate (it was awesome as always :D), back to his house.

I took the portable charger (the Level 1 that's included), I was thinking of taking our Level 2, but that thing is a beast, huge heavy cables, big box, etc., hahaha, it's not very "portable", though if I was staying somewhere where we were driving a lot for like several days, I might take it.

So it got an overnight charge, almost full, like 96%.

Drive directly home, on 95 we were doing a pretty constant "few over" :) At that speed, in H mode, the battery and ICE were constantly working together, had the ACC on, so the speed was pretty well regulated, tops in, windows up (so best case aero ...). I'm assuming the speed + wind (super windy) required both systems working together to sustain the MPH, but interesting in that is was more in a traditional PHEV mode. I'm not 100% sure when we went ICE only, but the battery lasted a long time (again, which is a little different than I expected).

So a straight up MPG calc of ~8g used for 170 miles is ~21MPG, but I think it's a little more complex, pure ICE in battery recharge mode for ~65 miles, some frisky driving around town, Max Reg most of the time, also running in 4H AUTO mode, not sure if there's any MPG advantage to 2H mode[?]

Oh yeah, so the 55-65 miles on E-save + Battery charge, at 70-ish on the highway, we picked up about 14-15% charge (IIRC).

Very cool.
This is something I would also like to know to get the best range "also running in 4H AUTO mode, not sure if there's any MPG advantage to 2H mode[?]". Also thanks @Wrangler4XEFan for the video about max regen vs drive by Brakes blend and how it utilizes the electric motor, very informative. In addition to range what is the best configuration for getting good standing 0-60 times as in leave it 4H Auto and Hybrid with brake torque?

Thanks
 
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